Review: A Cure for Wellness

With A Cure for Wellness, director Gore Verbinski returns to the glossy horror of his meandering 2002 remake of The Ring. An ambitious whiz kid executive, Lockhart (Dane DeHaan) is tasked with travelling to an unorthodox “wellness centre” in the Swiss Alps in search of the company CEO who seems to have permanently left his business pursuits behind. Lockhart’s pressing need to bring his boss back to New York – so that he can sign off on a company merger among other things – seems lost on the centre employees, especially Dr. Volmer (Jason Isaacs) who stresses the importance of “the cure” and his distaste for the complexities of modern life. “The cure” it seems, involves frequently drinking, swimming and being submerged in the water that runs through the Alps; careerist ideals are the illness. Continue reading “Review: A Cure for Wellness”

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Review: Split

When M.Knight Shyamalan sent James McAvoy the script for his film Split, the actor emailed back “What’s my characters name?” “Um, just read it” McAvoy plays Kevin Wendell Crumb, inflicted with a severe case of dissociative identity disorder (DID) and host to 23 differing identities. His most dangerous, steely personality Dennis kidnaps three teenage girls from a birthday party and keeps them captive in a labyrinth of underground tunnels – home to his ever-changing identity. The three girls are subject to the different egos and their unpredictable behavior. Continue reading “Review: Split”

Classic Review: Jacob’s Ladder (1990)

Jacob’s Ladder is a high dive into the fractured mind of Jacob Singer; a divorced Vietnam War veteran who carries the mental scars of war and the loss of his youngest child with him. The film opens with his battalion under attack from an unseen enemy. Panic, unease and chaos usually accompany war scenes as they do here, but in this case we understand something unusual is happening though it is unclear what. In the aftermath of these disturbing events, Jacob is taunted by what he can only describe as demons, hellish beings. Some of them are without faces; sometimes they pull him out of reality, bring him close to death and lay bare his issues. Continue reading “Classic Review: Jacob’s Ladder (1990)”

Classic Review: Videodrome (1983)

A word of warning, since this is a classic review, spoilers are contained herein. Though this article will not dilute the effectiveness of Videodrome for first time viewers, those sensitive to plot details are advised to watch the movie before reading this review


“Why would anybody watch a scum show like Videodrome?” asks its curator, Barry Convex (played by the late Leslie Carlson), head of the Spectacular Optical Corporation, an eyeglasses company that behind the scenes, specializes in NATO weapons manufacturing and serves as the antagonistic presence in the David Cronenberg movie that birthed the term “Cronenbergian”. Continue reading “Classic Review: Videodrome (1983)”